Wednesday, May 29, 2013

White Sox Jersey Remake/Tutorial

You all are probably rolling your eyes... seriously, Tara? A baseball jersey?

I hesitated on putting this up on my blog, given that I usually sew old-fashioned "cute" clothes, but when I started to do this, I hopped on Pinterest to get some ideas of what to do with the jersey and found NONE, so hopefully this will be helpful for anyone else who wants remake a baseball jersey.

(No, you do NOT need to remind me that the Cubs just beat the Sox... I already know)

My dad found a White Sox jersey at our local Ross (discount store). It was too small for him, and the last one there, so he picked it up for me. I was happy to finally have a jersey to wear, but it looked terrible on me! I looked like a boy, felt like a boy, and I just couldn't think of wearing that baggy thing in public. :)

So I threw it in my pile of clothes to remake, and there it sat all winter. Until yesterday when I wanted a quick project to sew, since I was "feeling the itch". As I said, I hunted around on Pinterest for ideas, and found nothing, so I just came up with the idea myself.


Yeah, blech.


(and yes, I know Quentin is not on the team anymore... why else do you think it was at a discount store?)


I'll write this in tutorial format (minus the photos... 'cuz I'm too lazy to take photos while I'm working).

1. I first ripped out the top stitching along the facing of the collar. The arm hole was way to low, so I wanted to pull up the shoulder seam to help with that.

2. I took the shoulder seam and sleeve in about 1 1/2", just a straight line across from the neck to the sleeve edge.

3. Then I cut off the top buttons and made the neckline a deeper V. After pulling the shoulder seam up, it was practically a turtleneck, so I definitely needed to do something to it. I just did a direct line from the shoulder seam front to the second button/button hole and stitched along that line, trimmed the access, and turned the facing back in.

4. I re-top-stitched the facing.



5. Then I pulled in the side seam about 1 1/2" on either side at the waist, and curving the seam  to create an "hour-glass" shape.

6. I did darts on the front, since it still needed a little shaping. They were 4" long, not tapered... more like "box-darts".



7. Finally, I cut the sleeves off so they were 2" long on the shoulder and 1" long under the arm, with a 1" hem, double stitched.

All the seams were trimmed and zig-zaged to finish them.

And Ta-Da! A much more feminine jersey!


And if you want to be a little more stylish, you can add a belt:


:) Thanks for stopping by!

9 comments:

  1. Absolutely nothing wrong with baseball jerseys! ;) And I love how you made it look so feminine! Even though, I'm a Yankee fan myself, so I'd do a NYY shirt.

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  2. Nice! I like how you gave it some shape for a feminine flair.

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  3. Cool idea! I like it. and baseball jerseys are awesome.

    -Leah Kathryn
    apassionatafortheking.blogspot.com

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  4. Kiri Liz - Thanks! Well, I guess you can have your team, and I'll have mine. :)

    Moriah Mari - :) I was really pleased with the shape of it! Thanks for the comment!!

    Leah K. Oxendine - :) Thank you!

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  5. so creative, Tara! You make it all sound so easy! you look super cute init, of course too:-)

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  6. It looks pretty good for a White Sox jersey. ;)
    Good job! :D

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  7. Christie - Aww, thanks! Miss you!!

    Emma - Haha, yep, that's as good a compliment as I'll ever get from a Cubs fan! Thanks! :)

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  8. You did a great job on this!!! I don't know that I would have come up with something so creative.

    I found your Blog through my sisters blog and have been so inspired by all your sewing projects. I especially like the min 1900s stuff you have done.

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  9. Hi Sarah - Thanks for stopping by my blog and for your kind words! Hope you'll be by again! :)

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